In a case of WTF, a 14-year-old New Jersey girl has been charged with possessing and distributing kiddie porn after posting explicit pictures on MySpace -- of herself.

The unnamed juvenile reportedly uploaded the racy images (and judging by what is allowed on MySpace, these must have been really racy) because she wanted her boyfriend to see them. If convicted, the girl would have to register as a sex offender and could also face up to 17 years of jail time.

Now it's true that the trend of sexting is lifting more than a few eyebrows and even having tragic consequences in some cases. And part of the predicament is that most states don't have laws specifically addressing teens who sext. But is charging this young girl with a crime really the way to stop all this teen titillation?

Click here for more.

Some say such a stiff penalty will curb other kids from participating in this kind of behavior. Karen, who runs a legal advice blog, says, "I don't know if this child should be charged with child pornography because of the intent behind her actions, but I sure as [hell] do not care that she is being charged with a crime. She's the example and hopefully other kids will keep their clothes on."

But others are concerned that pressing charges would set a dangerous precedent of criminalizing kids, not the sickos who are looking at pictures of them. Another case where child-porn charges were brought against a child was recently batted down.

What Bloggers Are Saying
Tracey
says the onus should fall on people who look at explicit pictures of children: "It shouldn't be illegal for [her] to do that. She has the right to expose her body if she wants to. If I happen to come across them I can choose not to look at them. If I save them to my computer then the crime is on me for possessing child porn."

Linda agrees: "The authorities need to go after the real criminals and not young kids who do stupid things ... Hopefully this is a wake-up call to those who think it's cool to send nude pictures of themselves. Common sense needs to prevail on this one."

Mari thinks the changing times and kids' constant access to technology is to blame: "To put her in the system is in no way going to help anyone. You cannot blame the parents. Even if you monitor, it could have been up only one day. These kids just don't realize how easy their lives are and they take everything for granted."

Clearly something needs to be done to keep kids safe from predators online. But there's got to be a better way -- counseling, school classes, restricted access to the Internet -- than turning them into criminals.

Tell us: What do you think the consequences, if any, should be for this girl? Have you caught your kids, relatives or other young people you know participating in this kind of behavior?